Introduction

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Breeding Program

Licensed Varieties

Kuranda

Kuranda is a broadly adapted, medium to long crop duration variety with good adaptation to coastal cropping environments from Nambour to the far north. It produces a very attractive shiny round medium size seed, clear hilum and light bright colour. It is attractive for use in higher value human consumption markets and all soy feed markets.

Kuranda has complex breeding. The variety is largely derived from its parent line M103-22 with several resistance genes backcrossed in.

Kuranda is owned by CSIRO, NSW DPI and GRDC and is available through Soy Australia Limited by a licence granted by GRDC.

pdf_iconDownload Kuranda Factsheet

New Bunya

The variety New Bunya is similar in most respects to its parent variety Bunya. The main difference is that it is strongly resistant to powdery mildew. As with Bunya, New Bunya is responsive in terms of grain yield to good agronomy and favourable irrigation supply. Planting to establish a population of 30 or more plants per m2 and irrigation through to grain fill is expected to result in higher yield and larger seed size.

New Bunya is owned by CSIRO, NSW DPI and GRDC and is available through Soy Australia Limited by a licence granted by GRDC.

pdf_iconDownload New Bunya Factsheet

Mossman

Mossman is similar to its parent variety Leichhardt for most characteristics. It differs in being slightly later flowering, longer crop duration and bigger bush size. It is well suited to growing as a green manure or break crop in rotation with sugarcane or as a forage crop. Mossman may also be grown over the winter season in the Burdekin with an April to mid-June planting date. It is a week or so longer crop duration than Leichhardt in this planting window.

Mossman is owned by CSIRO, NSW DPI and GRDC and is available through Soy Australia Limited by a licence granted by GRDC.

pdf_iconDownload Mossman Factsheet

Hayman

Hayman (Line NK55C-32) is a new variety from the Australian Soybean Breeding Program, first released in 2013 under PBR, and is currently licensed to Seednet. Hayman produces large pale seed with a clear hilum and readily produces protein levels above 43% dry matter basis. These traits provide growers with wider market options including the higher value human consumption markets as well as crushing markets. Hayman also possesses the 11sA4 protein null (like Bunya) that is valued by tofu processors. Hayman is resistant to powdery mildew, and has high tolerance to manganese toxicity, which is common in coastal soils. Hayman has similar weathering tolerance to A6785. Due to its large biomass and longer growing season on the North Coast it is recommended for grain production only at late season sowing dates (mid-late January). On the North Coast, Hayman provides a superior option to Warrigal or A6785 for very late sowing dates. Hayman is the best option for hay and silage production for sheep and dairy producers in the North Coast and Northern Tablelands regions of NSW and in southern Queensland. Hayman produces up to 25% greater biomass per hectare than Asgrow A6785, whilst maintaining the same feed values and less lodging. When sown on the same date Hayman takes around 12 days longer to mature than A6785, giving hay and silage producers a longer window of opportunity to cut the crop.

Hayman (NK55C-32) was bred by Dr Andrew James, CSIRO Brisbane and evaluated by Dr Ian Rose, NSW DPI Narrabri and Dr Natalie Moore, NSW DPI Grafton for the Australian Soybean Breeding Program.

pdf_iconDownload Hayman Factsheet

Richmond

Richmond (Line NF246-64) is a new variety from the Australian Soybean Breeding Program, first released in 2013 under PBR, and Is currently licensed to Seednet. Richmond is suited to production on the North Coast, northern tablelands and slopes and the Liverpool Plains regions of NSW. Richmond should also be considered for irrigated production systems in southern QLD. Richmond provides a clear hilum, high protein, large seeded alternative to A6785 and is suited to a mid-season sowing window on the coast (mid-late December). Richmond has the highest weathering tolerance of any currently available clear hilum variety, but is not quite as high as Zeus the dark hilum benchmark for weathering tolerance. Richmond has a compact plant type to minimise lodging, clean leaf drop and even ripening for ease of harvest.

Richmond was bred by Dr Andrew James, CSIRO and evaluated by Dr Natalie Moore, NSW DPI for the Australian Soybean Breeding Program.

pdf_iconDownload Richmond Factsheet

Moonbi

Moonbi is a variety released from the Australian National Soybean Breeding program and is commercially licensed by Soy Australia. Moonbi is a large clear hilum variety that has been bred for the NSW north coast and inland irrigation areas. In addition to good yield and seed protein, Moonbi also exhibits good weathering and is very quick to finish (about 10-12 days earlier than Soya791 at the same planting date). This is an advantage in coastal production areas to minimise the risk of encountering heavy rain at harvest. This trait is advantageous for double cropping systems allowing for early planting of winter crops & pastures. It is also advantageous to inland irrigated systems as it can reduce the need for additional irrigation water to finish the crop.

Bred by Dr Andrew James, CSIRO, Brisbane through the Australian Soybean Breeding Program (GRDC / CSIRO / I&I NSW)

pdf_iconDownload Moonbi Factsheet

Bunya

Bunya is quick-maturity variety suitable for most regions, group 5-6. Bred by CSIRO, Bunya was first released in 2006 under PBR, and is licensed to Soy Australia. Bunya is well suited for northern NSW and southern Queensland. It is a large-seeded culinary variety with a clear hilum. It is a preferred variety for tofu markets. Bunya is resistant to the two main races of phytophthora root rot in Queensland. The seed size of Bunya is very large, which can increase the risk of damage at harvest time. Germination checks and careful attention to seed-handling at planting is essential.

Bred by Dr Andrew James, CSIRO, Brisbane through the Australian National Soybean Breeding Program (GRDC / CSIRO / I&I NSW)

Snowy

Snowy is the first variety for Southern NSW and Northern Victoria with a clear hilum. It is also one of the first varieties suitable for the irrigated production in the Riverina that combines both good yield and high culinary grade quality. Snowy combines good tofu traits with good yield, maturity, disease resistance and agronomic traits.

Bred by Dr Andrew James, CSIRO, Brisbane through the Australian National Soybean Breeding Program (GRDC / CSIRO / I&I NSW)

Stuart

Stuart is a long-duration variety adapted to the tropics, group 8-9. Stuart was released by CSIRO in 2006 under PBR, it is licensed to Soy Australia. It is the first, light-coloured hilum variety suited to coastal and tropical Queensland. Stuart is a slow-maturing variety and should not be planted in areas south of Mackay. It is also adapted to dry season planting in the tropics. If sown at the correct time, Stuart is slightly less vegetative than Leichhardt. In rotation with sugarcane, this variety has the advantage of higher resistance to root nematodes than other soybean varieties. It also has resistance to the current rust races causing problems in cool, wet years on the Atherton Tableland.

Fraser

Fraser is a slow-maturing variety, group 7, released by CSIRO in 2007 under PBR, it is licensed to Soy Australia. It is suitable for southern Queensland from Gladstone to the New South Wales border. Fraser is a medium-seed size, clear hilum variety and is suitable for use in soy flour and soymilk manufacturing. Fraser matures about the same time as existing varieties but has higher grain yields and higher biomass production, making it ideal as a rotation crop for sugarcane. Sugarcane planted after soybean harvest are healthier and take advantage of nitrogen released from the breakdown of soybean biomass. It may also be used in tofu markets. Fraser is resistant to the two main races of phytophthora root rot in Queensland.

Bred by Dr Andrew James, CSIRO, Brisbane through the Australian National Soybean Breeding Program (GRDC / CSIRO / I&I NSW)